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Funding from the Institute for Museum and Library Services supported the electronic publication of this title. Text transcribed by Apex Data Services, Inc. The text has been entered using double-keying and verified against the original. Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved.

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Southern States -- Social conditions. African Americans -- Southern States. Reconstruction U. Southern States -- Description and travel. North Carolina -- Description and travel. Southern States -- History. Southern States -- Politics and government. Industrialization -- Southern States. Manufacturing industries -- Southern States. THIS book is the record of an extensive tour of observation through the States of the South and South-west during the whole ofand the Spring and Summer of The journey was undertaken at the instance of the publishers of Scribner's Monthly, who desired to present to the public, Bareback West Point Mississippi looking for load the medium of their popular periodical, an of the material resources, and the present social and political condition, of the people in the Southern States.

The author and the artists associated with him in the preparation of the work, traveled more than twenty-five thousand miles; visited nearly every city and town of importance in the South; talked with men of all classes, parties and colors; carefully investigated manufacturing enterprises and sites; studied the course of politics in each State since the advent of reconstruction; explored rivers, and penetrated into mountain regions heretofore rarely visited by Northern men.

They were everywhere kindly and generously received by the Southern people; and they have endeavored, by pen and pencil, to give the reading public a truthful picture of life in a section which has, since the close of a devastating war, been overwhelmed by a variety of misfortunes, but upon which the dawn of a better day is breaking.

The fifteen ex-slave States cover an area of more thansquare miles, and are inhabited by fourteen millions of people. The aim of the author has been to tell the truth ii as exactly and completely as possible in the time and space allotted him, concerning the characteristics of this region and its inhabitants.

The popular favor accorded in this country and Great Britain to the fifteen illustrated articles descriptive of the South which have appeared in Scribner's Monthly, has led to the preparation of the present volume.

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Much of the material which has appeared in Scribner will be found in its s; the whole has, however, been re-written, re-arranged, and, with numerous additions, is now simultaneously offered to the English-speaking public on both sides of the Atlantic. To the talent and skill of Mr. WELLS CHAMPNEY, the artist who accompanied the author during the greater part of the journey, the public is indebted for more than four hundred of the superb sketches of Southern life, character, and scenery which illustrate this volume.

The other artists who have contributed have done their work faithfully and well. TO MR. My Dear SirYou have been from first to last so inseparably as well as pleasantly connected with "The Great South" enterprise, that I cannot forbear taking this occasion to thank you, not only for originally suggesting the idea of a journey of observation through the Southern States, but also for having generously submitted to the enlargement of the first plan's scope, until the undertaking demanded a really immense outlay. I am sure that thousands of people will unite with me in testifying to you, and the gentlemen associated with you, their thanks for the lavish expenditure which has procured the beautiful series of engravings illustrating this volume.

What I have been able only to hint at, the artists have interpreted with a fidelity to life and nature in the highest degree admirable. I herewith present you the result of the t labor of author and artists, "The Great South" volume. Permit me, sir, to dedicate it to you, and by means of this humble tribute to express my admiration for the energy and unsparing zeal with which you have carried to completion the largest enterprise of its kind ever undertaken by a monthly magazine.

Louis--New Orleans.

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Louis Hotel, New Orleans. Charles Hotel, New Orleans. Paul's Church, New Orleans. Joseph's, St. Patrick's Jesuit Church and School. From the U. Census Reports. Mary's Church, San Antonio. Ogden, near Fort Riley, Kansas. Louis of to-day, from the high roof of the Insurance temple". Louis Life Insurance Company's Building. Benton for thirty years United States Senator from Missouri.

Harris, editor of the St. Louis "Journal of Speculative Philosophy". Louis Bridge, as it appeared during construction. Louis Bridge. Benton, in Lafayette Park. John's River, Florida. Harriet Beecher Stowe, at Mandarin, Florida. John's River, Fla. Augustine, Florida. Augustine, Florida--"An ancient gateway".

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Philip's Church, Charleston. Calhoun, Charleston. Finbar Cathedral, Charleston. Residence of one of the old Cherokee Landholders. John's Church, Richmond, Virginia. Jackson, known as "Stonewall Jackson.

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From a Painting in the Louisville Public Library. Andrew Jackson, near Nashville. Bienville, the Founder of New Orleans. In twenty years it may be Paradise Regained. It has unlimited, magnificent possibilities. Upon its bayou-penetrated soil, on its rich uplands and its vast prairies, a gigantic struggle is in progress. It is the battle of race with race, of the picturesque and unjust civilization of the past with the prosaic and leveling civilization of the present. For a century and a-half it was coveted by all nations; sought by those great colonizers of America,--the French, the English, the Spaniards.

It has been in turn the plaything of monarchs and the bait of adventurers. Its history and tradition are leagued with all that was romantic in Europe and on the Western continent in the eighteenth century. From its immense limits outsprang the noble sisterhood of South-western States, whose inexhaustible domain affords an ample refuge for the poor of all the world.

A little more than half a century ago the frontier of Louisiana, with the Spanish internal provinces, extended nineteen hundred miles. The territory 18 boasted a sea-coast line of five hundred miles on the Pacific Ocean; drew a boundary line seventeen hundred miles along the edge of the British-American dominions; thence followed the Mississippi by a comparative course for fourteen hundred miles; fronted the Mexican Gulf for seven hundred miles, and embraced within its limits nearly one million five hundred thousand square miles.

Texas was a fragment broken from it. California, Kansas, the Indian Territory, Missouri, and Mississippi, were made from it, and still there was an Empire to spare, watered by five of the finest rivers of the world. Indiana, Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska were born of it.

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From French Bienville to America Claiborne the territorial administrations were dramatic, diplomatic, bathed in the atmosphere of conspiracy. Superstition cast a weird veil of mystery over the great rivers, and Indian legend peopled every nook and cranny of the section with fantastic creations of untutored fancy. The humble roof of the log cabin on the banks of the Mississippi covered all the grace and elegance of French society of Louis the Fourteenth's time. Jesuit and Cavalier carried European thought to the Indians.

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Frenchman and Spaniard, Canadian and Yankee, intrigued and planned on Louisiana soil with an energy and fierceness displayed nowhere else in our early history. What wonder, after this cosmopolitan record, that even the fragment of Louisiana which has retained the name--this remnant embracing but a thirtieth of the area of the original province--yet still covering more than forty thousand square miles of prairie, alluvial, and sea marsh--what wonder that it is so richly varied, so charming, so unique?

Six o'clock, on Saturday evening, in the good old city of New Orleans. From the tower of the Cathedral St. Louis the tremulous harmony of bells drifts lightly on the cool spring breeze, and hovers like a benediction over the antique buildings, the blossoms and hedges in the square, and the broad and swiftly-flowing river.

The bells are calling all in the parish to offer masses for the repose of the soul of the Cathedral's founder, Don Andre Almonaster, once upon a time "perpetual regidor" of New Orleans. Every Saturday eve, for three-quarters of a century, the solemn music from the Cathedral belfry has brought the good Andre to mind; and the mellow notes, as we hear them, seem to call up visions of the quaint past.

Bareback West Point Mississippi looking for load

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Bareback West Point Mississippi looking for load